Sunday, November 26, 2017

Assisting Persons Can Have an Agenda

Michelle Carter assisted boyfriend's 
suicide,"wanted sympathy, attention"
By Margaret Dore, Esq., MBA

Persons assisting a suicide or performing euthanasia can have an agenda. Consider Tammy Sawyer, trustee for Thomas Middleton in Oregon. Two days after his death by assisted suicide, she sold his home and deposited the proceeds into bank accounts for her own benefit.[1]

In other states, reported motives for assisting suicide include: the “thrill” of getting other people to kill themselves; a desire for sympathy and attention; and “want[ing] to see someone die.”[2]